Sunday, April 9, 2017

Crater Creations

This technique needs a catchier name … something exotic and alien. It's related to frit lace, which I prefer to call frit fungus, but they are distant relatives at best. Regardless, I had a lot of fun with it and would enjoy pursuing it further. Wouldn't it look good as a floral-form drape? I can see votive holders, too, white with clear and just a little color … translucent enough to gather and magnify the candlelight.  

One suggestion:  when you go to play with this, make a small one first.  It will give a chance to become familiar with the depths, test the forming temperatures in your kiln and evaluate color combinations. This is also a technique that might behave differently depending on the shelf separator. I used Papyros paper for these. If you use Thinfire, shelf primer, or something else entirely — there’s another reason to experiment on a sm
all scale first.

In the video I confidently state that the reason the Whirlpool project had no needling (stick marks) was that opalescent glass is “stickier” than transparent. This is true and you'll periodically encounter evidence of it. But it was pointed out by one of my sharper Patrons (whose name shall remain Marcia Zajac), that the added thickness in the center would have reduced or eliminated the contraction, thus minimizing the needling. Nice. Thank you, Marcia. 
Next time I will go even deeper with the center area frit than I did in the video. I'd go a full quarter-inch (6mm), maybe even a bit more. This is for structural bulk. Mine is plenty strong but I think it would benefit by feeling more substantial in the bowl section. The firing schedules I used and other details are available on the Project PDF, link below the video.

So go forth and fuse! Good luck, and have fun --





Glasshoppa.com                          PROJECT PDF



23 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing! Looks like a lot of fun. Will be playing this week!

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  2. Thanks for sharing. it looks wonderful. One question though: what do you use to make the frits stick to the paper when you're building your project? thanks

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    1. I use generic aloe vera gel. Mine's from Target. Thanks!

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  3. I agree with you -- the lack of spikes in the final piece is likely do to the difference in viscosity between opals and transparents. Transparent glass will flow/move more easily. Great job and nice project idea!

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  4. Everything I wanted to know but was afraid to ask !!!!
    Thank you for sharing !!

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  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  6. Like the idea hoping to try it. Does float frit work ok?

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    1. I can't think of why it wouldn't .... If you're concerned, try it on a small scale first. Good luck; have fun --

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  7. I just discovered you, Jim. I'm a newbie glass fuser and loved the videos I have watched. This project calls to me and thanks for the needling details! I cherish tidbits of glass wisdom...

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    1. Thank you! Plenty more at http://www.patreon.com/glasshoppa

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  8. Its really excellent info.Thanks for very informative post you provided us which gave us a lot of information.

    Allan Low Glass

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  9. Hi Jim.
    Love your blog and videos - thank you. Can you give me a rough idea of how much frit (weight) you actually use. Being a beginner, I don't want to have started a small plate and then run out of frit!!
    Best wishes, Helene

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  10. Hi again, Jim. I completed my project some time ago but meant to ask... is the finished bowl supposed to have a rough texture or should i adjust the firing schedule? Thanks for your help!!

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    1. Christy, this project won't have the gloss of one with a smooth, uninterrupted surface. The nature of frit bumpy ...

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    2. Christy, I take it back. Mine have a nice smooth glassy finish. Try giving it more heat and see if yours don't improve ...

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  11. Ooo. I want a glossy finish! I will give that a shot. Thanks for checking!

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  12. Thanks so much for this cool project. My bowl has a glossy finish on top, but the underside and rim is very matte (ok) and scratchy feeling (not so ok). What would you suggest for smoothing the underside? Thanks!

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    1. Consider your firing surface. I used Papyros paper and am happy with the back surface. Compare the surface with that of your other (non-crater creations) fusing projects. Is it scratchier? If so, try going a little hotter next time.

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    2. Thanks, I used thinfire and I do think it is scratchier than usual, so I will try hotter. I already increased it by 20 degrees due to using 90 coe. I used diamond hand pads to fix this one. :-)

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  13. The project PDF isn't working. I would love the firing schedule.
    ~Artsy Fawn~

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    1. Sorry! It should work now -- thanks for letting me know.

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